• Music,  TV and Film,  Writing

    Sexy Voices, Part II

    Here’s a follow-up on last week’s post on Sexy Voices. Thanks everyone for your suggestions which sent me on a fun and inspiring search through Youtube! My apologies for not including every suggestion here.

    Beth Elliott recommended baritone Ildebrando d’Arcangelo. What a gorgeous voice and he doesn’t hurt the eyes, either! Here he is performing the seductive “La ci darem la mano” from Mozart’s Don Giovanni.

    I don’t know what possessed me not to have featured Alan Rickman last week. He could read poetry to me any day. Turn up the volume for maximum enjoyment!

    Any Regency hot voice collection has to include Sean Bean. Here he is narrating the beginning of a clip of the poignant “Over the Hills and Far Away”.

    Finally, I must include Gerard Butler, for his own artistic merit and also so Diane doesn’t cut my acquaintance!

    Enjoy!

    Elena
    www.elenagreene.com
    www.facebook.com/ElenaGreene

  • Uncategorized

    Happy birthday to all of us!

    Three years…a lifetime in the blogosphere, and thanks to you–our lurkers and readers and commenters–for your great comments and for dropping by so often. And extra special thanks to your employers for so generously lending us your time.

    I’ve learned so much from everyone here–it’s been a real education. And I’ve been humbled and amazed, too, by the smart, knowledgeable, funny people who have joined the Riskies family.

    With little originality, I’m going to remind you of my favorite posts over the last year.

    In my tireless campaign against gratuitous mantitty, I counterattacked with a post about Hot Old Men like the lovely and talented Alan Rickman: Women swooned at his imcomprehensible upperclass mumble and the slow crawl of his jowls seeking freedom from his high collar. And I promise, I will post about Hot Old Women sometime, too.

    I love our interviews too, and this year I was fortunate enough to get an exclusive with Cupid on Valentine’s Day. The Regency wasn’t bad, all things considered. Not too much whalebone, and no steel–that was tough, dealing with Victorian corsets. You wouldn’t believe the number of arrows I ruined. …

    You might think blogging on holidays is easy, but how on earth do you relate an American holiday, such as Thanksgiving, to the Regency? Fortunately, Thanksgiving 2007 was also George Eliot’s birthday and I pondered on why one of my favorite, flawed novels, Daniel Deronda, is like a turkey dinner.

    I also enjoyed our week celebrating the birthday of Jane Austen, and chose Mansfield Park–mainly because I suspected none of the other Riskies wanted it. I wasn’t even sure I wanted it myself. What a revelation, to read this sexy, difficult, daring book, and what a great discussion. Did anyone read it as a result? Tell us what you thought.

    I find there are topics we return to again and again, because they’re fascinating and influential, and we discover new facts we have to share. I blogged about the great astronomer William Herschel on March 13, the anniversary of the day he discovered the planet Uranus. I’m sure one of us will mention him again soon. I revisited another favorite topic, servants, in response to an email from a blog visitor who highly recommended Mrs. Woolf and the Servants by Alison Blight, and wondered how Woolf’s attitude to her servants was like or unlike that of Regency-era masters.

    Please tell us if there’s a topic you’d like to talk about–we love to hear from you! And if you’re a lurker, come by and make your first comment. Don’t be shy!

    Prizes? Oh yes, prizes.

    If you’re a writer, I’ll offer a critique of your first chapter and synopsis.

    If you’re a reader, you can win a signed copy of each of my books, Dedication, The Rules of Gentility, and Forbidden Shores (the last written as Jane Lockwood).

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